In the wake of Google Reader, Feedly wants to surf the big waves

By Matthew Lang Sottile, March 17, 2013.

In the wake of Google Reader, Feedly wants to surf the big waves

Imagine you run a startup where at least a thirty percent of your user base is syncing through an existing third-party platform. Then imagine what happens when it is revealed that the third party platform will be shut down forever in just a few months. This scenario became a reality for web-content aggregator Feedly this week, but fortunately they saw the writing on the wall.

On Wednesday Google announced that it will shutter its RSS platform Google Reader as of July, due to declined usage. We had a chance to talk with Cyril Moutran, the head of product and strategy at Feedly, about how they prepared for the end of Google Reader and what moves they will be making next.

About.me retraces its startup steps

By Matthew Lang Sottile, February 10, 2013.

About.me retraces its startup steps

Just over two years after being acquired, About.me announced on its blog early this week that it will be spinning out and becoming independent again. The service, which allows users to create a simple, single-page website about themselves, went public in 2010 and was acquired by AOL days later.

In a post by two of the three original co-founders, it was revealed that they are being financially backed by their management team and the NY Times reported that they plan to announce $5.7 million investment from a number of Silicon Valley venture firms.

Whether genuine, concept, or fabrication, the Chromebook Pixel raises questions

By Matthew Lang Sottile, February 06, 2013.

Whether genuine, concept, or fabrication, the Chromebook Pixel raises questions

Earlier today an allegedly leaked video detailing a previously unseen addition to Google’s Chromebook line of browser-based notebooks began stirring up a lot of attention in the technology community. The device, which markedly steps away from the cousin to the netbook, low-end trend of every Chromebook so far,  would seem to directly challenge both Apple’s Retina Macbook Pro models with a 2560 x 1700 resolution display, as well as Microsoft’s Surface by including a touchscreen.

Android Authority reported that the advertisement-style video showed up on developer Francois Beaufort’s Google+ page and then was quickly taken down. This was followed by an announcement and apology from the CEO of Slinky.me, the agency that seems to have created the video, that their servers had been hacked. A similar message still appears on the Slinky.me homepage, but the authenticity as well as any connection of that company to Google are still murky at this point. JR Raphael from Android Power lays out a number of reasons why we should be skeptical of the what this video dubs the Chromebook Pixel.

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